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14/05/21

This week's newsletter out today... https://t.co/AlfpKxBo3G https://t.co/c2U9Em4Y7j

13/05/21

The May Parents’ Pack from is out now - https://t.co/YBwb7Sw7DK

13/05/21

Vacancy: Exciting short term teaching vacancy required for maternity cover. We are seeking a Religious Education teacher to teach across the age and ability ranges, from 1 September to 22 October 2021. To apply https://t.co/7Qnx6dAT1E https://t.co/8Qkv4oX1Nc

13/05/21

Take a moment to be mindful and connect with nature, relax in the garden, listen to birdsong or watch the sunset. Taking in your surroundings can help find a sense of calm https://t.co/VPyseBc5Sj

13/05/21

Term date reminder: school will be closed to students on Monday 17 May 2021, due to staff INSET. https://t.co/IXEyjH89GA

13/05/21

The books of the week are The Bubble Wrap Boy by Phil Earle and The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge. Read some of The Bubble Wrap Boy - https://t.co/Dxsn07X08A Watch this video of Frances Hardinge talking about her book, The Lie Tree- https://t.co/ooPZFKoBbb https://t.co/n0CDtVje20

12/05/21

Happy Eid al Fitr Mubarak to all our families celebrating the end of the fast of Ramadan https://t.co/HLNZBgGpYT

12/05/21

Year 7 kicked off their Journalism Club today, with enthusiasm in abundance. The Press Pack have been formed, assignments distributed and we cannot wait to see the results https://t.co/ybqg0KPpUL

12/05/21

Being positive is not needing to always be happy, being positive can be a simple acceptance https://t.co/fsCta8h0db

12/05/21

Retweeted From SJL Geography

This week our year 7 geographers used their excellent work from last week to write their 'to what extent' essays. https://t.co/lV6OoeVdd9

11/05/21

Govia Thameslink Railway are offering virtual work experience opportunity during half term week (1-4 June), places are limited. Ideal for students to gain an understanding of the industry. To register interest, respond to Roopali Sharma: roopali.sharma.com https://t.co/tfn1YxFfs1

11/05/21

Now more things are opening up for us to do indoors, remember to keep up the connections gained with nature during lockdown https://t.co/2ZQhFSTgdz

11/05/21

Retweeted From Sir John Lawes Music

Yr11 finished their assessments and back to playing music - with conducting debuts from some rising musical stars! 🎶 https://t.co/vhyR85EBfp

10/05/21

Retweeted From Mental Health Fdn

📣 starts today. Help us to get the nation talking about nature and mental health. 🌳Join the movement. . Get involved. https://t.co/rKW9Y90uRp

10/05/21

Students begin the week with an assembly from Mrs Montgomery-Ward "improve your mental health through your connection with nature" Why not get creative, take a photograph of a landscape or sketch a natural object https://t.co/iQaDPgdtzn

10/05/21

Retweeted From National Online Safety

We’re proud to be supporting 's 💙 Discover our full suite of guides this and download our free app for parents & educators 👇 Apple >> https://t.co/WHVW429N3T Android >> https://t.co/zbcJLCsJOz https://t.co/ONZXYwtjjO

10/05/21

Thought for the Week: Avoiding blame https://t.co/o4wIuefku1

08/05/21

Fantastic performance boys! https://t.co/mZA8BisYFC

07/05/21

Fabulous!

07/05/21

Retweeted From Jo Mylles

An excellent HoD opportunity in our brilliant school. See the link here: https://t.co/Qk7L3jUoqY

07/05/21

Retweeted From Alban Teaching School Hub

Getting ECF ready for September. The Alban TSH are looking forward to delivering the Full Induction Programme in conjunction with to schools across our hub region Contact enquiries.co.uk https://t.co/89CS7sVqYU

07/05/21

Retweeted From SJL Ecoschools

This week, with a little extra help from Mr Dunning and Ms Turner in the our year 9 team planted sweet peas, nasturtium, marigolds and wildflowers! We also covered potatoes again & potted out celeriac seedlings! We are also prepping for https://t.co/oNN35SLC5j

07/05/21

The books of the week are Ingo by Helen Dunmore and We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. Read opening of Ingo https://t.co/XK60gWZNzh Watch an interview with Karen Joy Fowler about her novel https://t.co/BJQA5AxCGi https://t.co/lvkxF4Card

07/05/21

Vacancy alert: are you an excellent Media teacher? Looking to join a Media Faculty with fantastic facilities including film studio and Mac suite? SJL seeking Media Teacher for maternity cover https://t.co/GtcyGN4Alu https://t.co/Q9YWqcrVYw

07/05/21

This week's newsletter out today... https://t.co/TbF0vbAoJR https://t.co/e3AS3qKvOL

07/05/21

To confirm: SJL is open as normal today. The site has water and we have been assured by Affinity Water that it will not be disconnected at any point.

05/05/21

Use what you can control, your attitude https://t.co/G6xDOsISFK

05/05/21

Retweeted From SJL Geography

Year 7 planning their essays by building 'on the one hand' and 'on the other hand' style argument. They did really well collating their information on a Venn diagram and then choosing their arguments for their essay by adding facts to their 'to what extent hands'. https://t.co/zDRmEMgBsX

04/05/21

Year 11 reminder: reply slips for accepting Sixth Form places must be in by this Friday 7 May 2021 https://t.co/FasLWKuVmd

04/05/21

Mrs Daniels has a collection of unnamed coats and football boots in lost property (some photographed below). Please tell your child to go to First Aid to be reunited with their possessions. https://t.co/wPdSgzo6gp

04/05/21

Year 11 reminder: payment for this year's prom is available on ParentPay now. We are delighted to be able to offer this celebration at Luton Hoo Walled Gardens. https://t.co/PAq5hMVLLv

04/05/21

Thought for the Week: Being motivated https://t.co/rncgsudTDr

30/04/21

Congratulations to Year 8 on all achieving Bully Free Form status Thanks to Miss Bonner for rescheduling the assessments for Year 8, who had to miss their assessment during Year 7. https://t.co/jiikWcaT4V

30/04/21

This week's newsletter out today... https://t.co/Qh6Dn3j8AS https://t.co/UVuIySCe9A

29/04/21

Retweeted From SJL Ecoschools

This week it was the turn ouf our Year 9s in the they did a great job of watering and weeding! The gardennis really starting to come along now. Next week we will sow some wild flowers from https://t.co/Lrb2JnQ43J

29/04/21

Our thanks to Nommy from for talking to the SJL BLM Youth Forum today. Herts Young Leaders is an emerging charity set up to empower disadvantaged young people. https://t.co/jpjZGSuWws

29/04/21

SJL playing host for today's BLM Youth Forum with and . Students coming together across the county to empower each other on the subject of Black Lives Matter https://t.co/JVVhNgaLIl

29/04/21

The books of the week are Lightning Mary by Anthea Simmons , Mortal Engines by Phillip Reeve and Burial Rites by Hannah Kent. We have these at the library so come and borrow them! https://t.co/ERUuxjItQJ

28/04/21

Stand out, feel good https://t.co/WTQcur1o2R

27/04/21

Year 8 reminder: options forms deadline tomorrow! Thank you to those who have returned their forms, any outstanding forms please email to options.herts.sch.uk Copies of the form can be found on the school website https://t.co/ecyKxs9q9P https://t.co/V5vzbDWozm

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Science

About the Faculty

The science faculty is a high achieving and successful faculty, staffed by a range of specialist science teachers in Biology, Chemistry and Physics and science technicians.  We enable pupils to use and apply the “Big Ideas” of science.

Working together we aim to achieve this by;

  • Raising students’ interest and motivation in science through outstanding teaching and learning and extra-curricular STEM provision linked to the "Big Ideas" of science.
  • Providing a curriculum that facilitates pupils in developing a knowledge and understanding of science which prepares them for further study.
  • Enabling students to use scientific enquiry skills to create balanced evidence based arguments and to use models to explain natural phenomena.
  • To be able to use a range of approaches to plan and carry out a variety of practical investigations.
  • Developing students scientific literacy and numeracy skills so they are able to communicate clearly and precisely in a variety of formats.

 

Curriculum Intent Statement

The science curriculum at Sir John Lawes contains an ambitious range of core scientific knowledge that builds upon prior knowledge and understanding from previous Key Stages and provides a strong foundation of knowledge required for further study.  The curriculum is planned around the “Big Ideas” of science which are core ideas that underpin all scientific understanding with knowledge being developed further as pupils progress through Key Stages.  The curriculum plan is flexible, allowing teachers to utilise their subject expertise and pupils to become better scientists who can use their knowledge to live in a more sustainable and technologically advanced world. 

Key Stage 3 Curriculum

Year 7

In Year 7, 10 Key Stage 3 Science modules are taught, covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  During each module students will all complete a formally assessed task and take a written test at the end of each module.  Students will be given a target for this test and opportunities to review their performance and make improvements.

The modules are taught on a rota basis to ensure all students are able to access the practical activities to support their scientific understanding, the exact order of which can be found from your son or daughter’s Science teacher at the start of the year.  In the Autumn term of Year 7 students are taught in mixed ability groups.

Autumn term

  • Safety and skills – an introduction into safety in a science laboratory.
  • Cells – What is inside a cell? How do they help make living objects? How are plant and animals cells different?
  • Acids – How can I tell if something is an acid? What will be produced when an acid reacts with another substance?
  • Forces – How can we make objects move or stay in the same place?

At the end of the autumn term teaching groups will be rearranged into new groups for the rest of the year.  Students’ performance in assessments made throughout the term will be used to put students into the most suitable groups for them.

Spring term

  • Elements – What is an element? How do elements make all the objects around us?
  • Particles – What is a particle? How do they help to make up the objects we see today?
  • Reproduction – How do plants and animals reproduce?  What’s the difference between internal and external fertilisation? Why is IVF used?
  • Energy – What are the different types of energy? How are they transferred into another form? Are they all sustainable?

At the end of these modules students will take an end of year exam covering the content of all the work studied in Year 7 during the Key Stage 3 Internal Assessment Week. The results along with all other assessments during the year will be used for regrouping students in Year 8.

Summer Term

  • Heating and cooling – What happens when a material heats up or cools down? What happens when a material melts or boils?
  • Differences – Why are we all different to one another? What causes these differences?

Year 8

In Year 8 there are 8 Key Stage 3 Science modules taught, covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  During each module students will complete a formally assessed task and complete a written test at the end.  Students will be given a target for this test and opportunities to review their performance and make improvements.

The modules are taught on a rota basis to ensure all students are able to access the practical activities to support their scientific understanding, the exact order of the modules can be found from your son or daughter’s Science teacher at the start of the year. 

Autumn Term

  • Gas Exchange and Respiration – How do living things exchange gases with their environment?  How does respiration provide us with energy?
  • Electricity – How can electrical energy be made to flow? What are the different types of circuits and how are they different?
  • Periodic Table – How does the Periodic Table show patterns within groups of elements?
  • Chemical reactions – How can I group chemical reactions together? How can I decide if a chemical reaction takes place?

Spring term

  • Nutrition – How do our bodies use nutrients from food?
  • Waves – How can we describe the properties of sound, light and seismic waves and interact with them?
  • Physics in the Universe – What’s in our solar system? Why do we have seasons? Why does the moon appear to change shape?

At the end of these modules students will take an end of year exam covering the content covered in Year 7 and 8 during the Key Stage 3 Internal Assessment Week.  The results along with all other assessments throughout the year will be used for setting students into their Year 9 groups.

Summer term

  • The Earth and Atmosphere – How does the geology of the Earth affect us?
  • Photosynthesis and Ecosystems – How do plants use sunlight to produce the nutrients they need?  How does this support animal life?

Year 9

Autumn Term

In Year 9 students will study a series of topics specifically designed to prepare them, both in terms of knowledge and skills, for success in their GCSE courses.  These “bridging units” build on their work at Key Stage 3 and support content that is important at GCSE, while developing literacy, mathematical and practical skills.  Each unit will be assessed in the style of a GCSE module.

The four bridging units are:

  • Biology – Many of the key principles of Key Stage 4 are studied through the lens of human biology.  Students will study how we use energy, fight off disease and maintain our bodies in physical and chemical balance.
  • Chemistry – Students will study the key principles of atoms and their reactions, and how these can be measured and analysed.
  • Physics – Students will experience a thorough grounding in the use of units and calculations with the example of motion.
  • Investigative Skills – Students will carry out an investigative project from one of the Science disciplines.  This will involve planning, preliminary work, data collection, analysis and evaluation and will support the students in developing the practical and analytical skills they will need for GCSE.

Spring and Summer Terms

All students study the first three modules of the OCR 21st Century Science GCSE Course (B1, C1, P1).  These modules are taught on a rotation basis to allow pupils the maximum opportunity for practical activities to support their learning.

Each module is approximately 12 lessons long.  At the end of the module the students sit an end of topic test in the style of the GCSE papers; you can expect them to be given a target for this test and a suggestion for how to improve.

B1: You and Your Genes – What are genes? Why are families alike but not identical? How can genetic information be used?  How is a clone made?

C1: Air and Water – What are the chemicals and pollutants in the air?  What produces air pollutants? What effects do these have and how can we improve air quality?

P1: Radiation and Waves – What are the properties and uses of waves?  How can we use the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum?

At the end of the Summer term students will take an exam paper on these three modules.  It is one hour long and the marks gained in this exam, along with students’ end of Key Stage 3 Teacher Assessment, end of module tests and their class teachers own assessment will be used to make a final decision as to which course (Combined Science or Triple Science) students will follow for their GCSE qualifications.

KS3 Curriculum Map

Key Stage 4 Curriculum

At SJL, we teach the OCR 21st Century Science course, which explores the application of the science that underpins everyday life and has practical work at its heart. The course is designed to bring science to life; allowing students to develop practical and data analysis skills whilst learning key concepts, models and theories that build on their learning from key stage three. The course gives students an ideal foundation of scientific understanding to ensure that they can comprehend the science that matters in their lives and then build on this, if they choose to, by studying sciences at A Level and beyond.

There are two routes to take through the OCR 21st Century Science course: Combined Science and Triple Science. This allows students the flexibility to choose the route most suited to their aptitude and enthusiasm. Students receive advice and recommendations from their teachers to help them make sure they make the correct decision before the end of Y9. Both routes involve the study of 18 modules in total (6 per science subject).

Option 1: Combined Science

In this route students will study towards achieving a qualification equivalent to two GCSEs and the final pair of grades awarded will, effectively, be an average grade across all three sciences.

This qualification culminates in 4 examinations: one paper for each of the three sciences and one ‘Combined Science’ paper, which could examine content from any of the sciences and focusses largely on assessing the students’ practical and data analysis skills.

The students will study the same 18 modules as Triple Science students (6 for each of the sciences), but each module has some of the content omitted. This makes the volume of content less than for Triple Science, but the complexity of the content is the same as Triple Science. The qualifications gained through this course are well respected for Higher and Further Education courses and studying this course does not rule a student out from studying science at A Level, as long as they meet the entry requirements.

Option 2: Triple Science: Biology, Chemistry & Physics

In this route students will study towards achieving three separate GCSEs, one for each of the science subjects (Biology, Chemistry and Physics). The grades achieved in one science are unaffected by the grades achieved in any other science.

This qualification culminates in 6 examinations: one ‘Breadth’ and one ‘Depth’ paper for each of the 3 sciences. The ‘Breadth’ paper examines a broad range of topics in less detail and the ‘Depth’ paper examines a narrow range of topics in more detail.

The students will study all aspects of all 18 modules (6 for each of the sciences) and the complexity and volume of content included in Triple Science is greater than for the Combined course. Ideal students for Triple Science are those who wish to study sciences at A Level and beyond, or use science in their chosen career, and those who are enthusiastic and conscientious, with a genuine curiosity for explaining how and why things happen in the world around them.

OCR website


GCSE Subjects

GCSE Biology

Triple Science students study the OCR Twenty First Century Biology Course (J257)

Year 10

Having already studied the first Biology module (B1) in Year 9; in Year 10, triple science students will study three further modules:  B2, B3 and B4. 

B2:  Keeping Healthy:  What are the causes of disease? How do organisms protect themselves against pathogens? How can we prevent the spread of infections? How can we identify the cause of an infection? How can lifestyle, genes and the environment affect my health? How can we treat disease?

B3:  Living Together- Food and Ecosystems:  What happens during photosynthesis? How do producers get the substances they need? How are organisms in an ecosystem interdependent? How are populations affected by conditions in an ecosystem?

B4:  Using Food and Controlling Growth:  What happens during cellular respiration? How do we know about mitochondria and other cell structures? How do organisms grow and develop? How is plant growth controlled? Should we use stem cells to treat damage and disease?

The modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment: the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Biology teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty- fifty minute end of topic assessment in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the B123 modules during Year 10 exam week in June.

Year 11

In Year 11, triple science students will study the remaining two Biology modules. Any content from module B4 will be completed to start with, followed by B5 and B6.

B5:  The Human Body- Staying Alive:  How do substances get into, out of and around our bodies? How does the nervous system help us respond to changes? How do hormones control responses in the human body? Why do we need to maintain a constant internal environment? What role do hormones play in human reproduction? What can happen when organs and control systems stop working?

B6:  Life on Earth- Past, Present and Future:  How was the theory of evolution developed? How do sexual and asexual reproduction affect evolution? How does our understanding of biology help us classify the diversity of organisms on Earth? How is biodiversity threatened and how can we protect it?

Again, the modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment; the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Biology teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty-fifty minute end of topic test in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the B1234 modules during the Year 11 mock exam period in December.

Back to GCSE Subjects


GCSE Chemistry

Triple Science students study the OCR Twenty First Century Chemistry Course (J258)

Year 10

Having already studied the first Chemistry module (C1) in Year 9; in Year 10, triple science students will study three further modules:  C2, C3 and C4.

C2:  Chemical patterns:  How have our ideas about atoms developed over time? What does the Periodic Table tell us about the elements? How do metals and non-metals combine to form compounds? How are equations used to represent chemical reactions? What are the properties of transition metals?

C3:  Chemicals of the Natural Environment – How are the atoms held together in a metal? How are metals with different reactivities extracted? What are electrolytes and what happens during electrolysis? Why is crude oil important as a source of new materials?

C4: Material Choices:    How is data used to choose a material for a particular use? What are the different types of polymers? How do bonding and structure affect properties of materials? Why are nanoparticles so useful? What happens to products at the end of their useful life?

The modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment: the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Chemistry teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty- fifty minute end of topic assessment in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the C123 modules during Year 10 exam week in June.

Year 11

In Year 11, triple science students will study the remaining two Chemistry modules. Any content from module C4 will be completed to start with, followed by C5 and C6.

C5:  Chemical Analysis:  How are chemicals separated and tested for purity? How do chemists find the composition of unknown samples? How are the amounts of substances in reactions calculated? How are the amounts of chemicals in solution measured?

C6:  Making useful Chemicals:  What useful products can be made from acids? How do chemists control the rate of reactions? What factors affect the yield of chemical reactions? How are chemicals made on an industrial scale?

Again, the modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment; the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Chemistry teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty-fifty minute end of topic test in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the C1234 modules during the Year 11 mock exam period in December.

Back to GCSE Subjects


GCSE Physics

Triple Science students study the OCR Twenty First Century Physics Course (J259)

Year 10

Having already studied the first Physics module (P1) in Year 9; in Year 10, triple science students will study three further modules:  P2, P3 and P4. 

P2:  Sustainable energy:  How much energy do we use?  How can electricity be generated?  Which energy sources should we choose?

P3:  Electric circuits:  What is electric charge? What determines the current in an electric circuit? How do series and parallel circuits work? What determines the rate of energy transfer in a circuit? What are magnetic fields? How do electric motors work? What is the process inside an electric generator?

P4:  Explaining motion:  What are forces? How can we describe motion? What is the connection between forces and motion? How can we describe motion in terms of energy transfers?

The modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment: the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Physics teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty- fifty minute end of topic assessment in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the P123 modules during Year 10 exam week in June.

Year 11

In Year 11, triple science students will study the remaining two Physics modules. Any content from module P4 will be completed to start with, followed by P5 and P6.

P5:  Radioactive Materials:  What is radioactivity? How can radioactive materials be used safely? How can radioactive materials be used to provide energy?

P6: Matters- Models and ExplanationsHow does energy transform matter? How does the particle model explain the effects of heating? How does the particle model relate to material under stress? How does the particle model relate to pressure in fluids? How can scientific models help us understand the Big Bang?

Again, the modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment; the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Physics teacher at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty-fifty minute end of topic test in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment.

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for the P1234 modules during the Year 11 mock exam period in December.

Back to GCSE Subjects

GCSE Combined Science

Students study the OCR Twenty First Century Combined Science (J260)

Year 10

Having already studied the first three Science modules (B1, C1 and P1) in Year 9; in Year 10, combined science students will study three further modules in each science:  B2, B3 and B4 in Biology, C2, C3 and C4 in Chemistry and P2, P3 and P4 in Physics. 

B2:  Keeping Healthy:  What are the causes of disease? How do organisms protect themselves against pathogens? How can we prevent the spread of infections? How can lifestyle, genes and the environment affect my health? How can we treat disease?

C2:  Chemical patterns:  How have our ideas about atoms developed over time? What does the Periodic Table tell us about the elements? How do metals and non-metals combine to form compounds? How are equations used to represent chemical reactions?

P2:  Sustainable energy:  How much energy do we use?  How can electricity be generated?  Which energy sources should we choose?

B3:  Living Together- Food and Ecosystems:  What happens during photosynthesis? How do producers get the substances they need? How are organisms in an ecosystem interdependent? How are populations affected by conditions in an ecosystem?

C3:  Chemicals of the Natural Environment – How are the atoms held together in a metal? How are metals with different reactivities extracted? What are electrolytes and what happens during electrolysis? Why is crude oil important as a source of new materials?

P3:  Electric circuits What determines the current in an electric circuit? How do series and parallel circuits work? What determines the rate of energy transfer in a circuit? What are magnetic fields? How do electric motors work?

B4:  Using Food and Controlling Growth:  What happens during cellular respiration? How do we know about mitochondria and other cell structures? How do organisms grow and develop? Should we use stem cells to treat damage and disease?

C4: Material Choices:    How is data used to choose a material for a particular use? How do bonding and structure affect properties of materials? Why are nanoparticles so useful? What happens to products at the end of their useful life?

P4:  Explaining motion:  What are forces? How can we describe motion? What is the connection between forces and motion? How can we describe motion in terms of energy transfers?

The modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment; the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Science teachers at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty-fifty minute end of topic test in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for each Science and an overall ‘Combined Science’ exam during Year 10 exam week in June. The Biology, Chemistry and Physics exams will include questions assessing the following modules respectively: B123, C123 and P123. The fourth ‘Combined Science’ exam draws on content from any of the aforementioned modules and assesses the students practical and data analysis skills.

Year 11

In Year 11, combined science students will study the remaining two modules in each Science. Any content from modules B4, C4 and P4 will be completed to start with, followed by B5 and B6 in Biology, C5 and C6 in Chemistry and P5 and P6 in Physics.

B5:  The Human Body- Staying Alive:  How do substances get into, out of and around our bodies? How does the nervous system help us respond to changes? How do hormones control responses in the human body? Why do we need to maintain a constant internal environment? What role do hormones play in human reproduction? What can happen when organs and control systems stop working?

C5:  Chemical Analysis:  How are chemicals separated and tested for purity? How are the amounts of substances in reactions calculated? How are the amounts of chemicals in solution measured?

P5:  Radioactive Materials:  What is radioactivity? How can radioactive materials be used safely?

B6:  Life on Earth- Past, Present and Future:  How was the theory of evolution developed? How does our understanding of biology help us classify the diversity of organisms on Earth? How is biodiversity threatened and how can we protect it?

C6:  Making useful Chemicals:  What useful products can be made from acids? How do chemists control the rate of reactions? What factors affect the yield of chemical reactions?

P6: Matters- Models and ExplanationsHow does energy transform matter? How does the particle model explain the effects of heating? How does the particle model relate to material under stress?

Again, the modules are taught on a rota basis to minimise the demand for duplicated practical equipment; the exact order of the modules can be found out from your son or daughter’s Science teachers at the start of the year.

Each module varies in length and, at the end of each module, the students sit a forty-fifty minute end of topic test in the style of a GCSE exam paper. You can expect them to be given a target for improvement after this assessment. 

In addition to this, there will be a mock exam for each Science and an overall ‘Combined Science’ exam during the Year 11 mock exam period in December. The Biology, Chemistry and Physics exams will include questions assessing the following modules respectively: B1234, C1234 and P1234. The fourth ‘Combined Science’ exam draws on content from any of the aforementioned modules and assesses the students practical and data analysis skills

Back to GCSE Subjects

KS4 Curriculum Map

Key Stage 5 Curriculum

Biology

Biology A Board: OCR (H420A)

Biology involves the study of a wide range of fascinating topics, ranging from molecular biology to the study of ecosystems. Biology is never far from the headlines and is at the cutting edge of modern scientific developments. The OCR A Level Biology course is designed to encourage candidates to develop enthusiasm for Biology, whilst learning and improving practical skills which can be backed up with scientific understanding and problem solving.

Where could my success take me?

Biology is a great choice of subject for people considering a career in medical professions, such as; Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy, Pharmacy or Optometry. It would also prepare you for further study in the Life Sciences, for example Zoology, Marine Biology, Biochemistry or Neuroscience.

Assessment

A total of 6 hours of examinations (2 x 2 hours 15 minutes and 1 x 1 hour 30 minutes) taken at the end of the course.

All exam papers will include a wide range of question types including multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of both theory and practical skills through the examinations.

Practical Endorsement - a separate grade (pass/fail) will be awarded for practical work carried out throughout the two years of the course as specified by OCR. This will be internally assessed by your teachers.

Skills required for success: hard working, positive attitude, determination, ability to work independently, interest in reading around the subject to extend knowledge.

Course content

In the first year of the A Level you will discover more about the structure of cells, which are the basic units of all living things, seeing how they communicate and form co-operated, integrated systems within living bodies. You will look at the important biological molecules and study their vital roles in living organisms, including how these can be used for beneficial use in living organisms or could possibly cause disease.

In the second year modules you will consider how organisms influence the environments they live in, how waste products are removed and will study in depth the biochemical processes of photosynthesis, respiration and excretion. You will start a journey into genetics by exploring how genes work, the processes involved in genetic engineering and how this relates to medicine, ecosystems and conservation. You will also learn about how nerves carry signals throughout the body and how they form the intricate complexity of the human nervous system.

Entry requirements

GCSE Triple Science Biology at grade 6 or above

APS of 4.5 or above

OR

GCSE Combined Science at grade 7-6 or above AND

Grade 6 or above in GCSE Mathematics

APS of 4.5 or above

It would be useful to study Chemistry alongside Biology, but it is not essential.

 

Chemistry

Chemistry B Salters Board: OCR (H433)

Chemistry is the study of materials, their reactions and the laws that govern them.

Chemistry is essential for studying Medicine and Veterinary Science as well as Chemistry courses. It is highly recommended for Biological Sciences.

Assessment

A total of 6 hours of examinations (2 x 2 hours 15 minutes and 1 x 1 hour 30 minutes) taken at the end of Year 13.

All exam papers will include a wide range of question types including multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of both theory and practical skills through the examinations.

Practical Endorsement - a separate grade (pass/fail) will be awarded for practical based work carried out throughout the two years of the course as specified by OCR.

Course content

In this modern course, you will learn the core theory through study of current applications of chemistry. You will be introduced to organic, inorganic and physical chemistry while learning about topics such as fuels, colours and the chemical industry. Then you will study the chemistry of ozone, minerals and polymers. Activities include practical work, problem solving, data analysis, modelling with ICT, research and presentation.

In the second year of the A Level course there is greater emphasis on the design of molecules and materials to fit a purpose, such as polymers, dyes and medicines. Their analysis and synthesis are also considered. Practical skills are develop further fully preparing students for university based laboratory work.

Entry requirements

GCSE Triple Science Chemistry at grade 6 or above

APS of 4.5 or above

OR

GCSE Combined Science at grade 7-6 or above AND

Grade 6 or better in GCSE Mathematics

APS of 4.5 or above

It is useful if you also take another Science or Maths, but this is not essential to support the study of Chemistry.

 

Physics

Physics Board: Edexcel (9PH0)

Edexcel offers a concept-led approach to studying Physics. This approach begins with a study of the laws, theories and models of physics and finishes with an exploration of their practical applications.

You will require: a curiosity about how and why things in the world around you work, an ability to solve problems and use mathematical tools to model various situations, and a positive and organised attitude towards your studies.

Physics is essential for any Engineering or Computing based courses.

Assessment

Three written papers at the end of Year 13

Paper 1: Advanced Physics I (1 hour and 45 minutes)

Paper 2: Advanced Physics II (1 hour and 45 minutes)

Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Physics (2 hours and 30 minutes)

All exam papers will include a wide range of question types, including: multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of both theory and practical skills through these examinations.

Practical Endorsement - A separate grade (Pass/Fail) will be awarded for practical based work carried out throughout the two years of the course.

Course content

You will learn about modelling a variety of physical concepts, and will study Mechanics, Materials, Waves, Electricity, Thermodynamics, Space and Nuclear Radiation (amongst other topics, second year A Level topics shown in bold). All aspects of the course (including practical skill and knowledge) will be assessed through exam papers at the end of the 2 year course.

Entry requirements

GCSE Triple Science Physics at grade 6 or above

APS of 4.5 or above

OR

GCSE Combined Science at grade 7-6 or above AND

Grade 6 or above in GCSE Mathematics

APS of 4.5 or above

It is useful if you also take A Level Maths alongside this course to support the study of Physics, but this is not essential.

Marking Policy

Extended Curriculum

Through pupils’ science learning, we aim to enable their use of factual information, so making informed choices and recognising information that could be classified as “fake news”.  This will allow pupils to make the best possible decisions for their lives using a range of scientific skills whether it be in a scientific field of study or just in an everyday life situation.

We also offer extracurricular activities including Science Club, trips to the annual National Big Bang Fair, CERN and celebrate a whole school science week.

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